Category Archives: Tim Lang

What are people for?

Wendell Berry’s book “What are people for?” is more appropriate today than when it was published 30 years ago. In one paragraph he sums up exactly what it means to be a passive consumer of food.

“We still (sometimes) remember that we cannot be free if our minds and voices are controlled by someone else. But we have neglected to understand that we cannot be free if our food and its sources are controlled by someone else. The condition of the passive consumer of food is not a democratic condition. One reason to eat responsibly is to live free.”

Wendell Berry, “What are people for?”, North Point Press, New York, 1990. P.147

Bountiful green ‘playgrounds’

Another interesting article from The Straits Times Note: the circuit breaker is the Singapore version of lock down.

Having just sown a lot of radish seeds this caught my eye “….. no vegetable goes to waste. Radish roots are used to make fried radish cake, while the radish tops go into soups and stir-fried dishes.”

Singapore has long been a leader in growing food in cities. Chengi Hospital has a roof top farm which produces fresh vegetables for the kitchens, no cook-chill there! There has to be innovation cities where space is at a premium. There are also important lessons here about local food as Tim Lang says:

“Food may come to consumers locally – in your shop or home – but is actually the result of international , national and regional dynamics”
[From: “Why UK Food Security Matters” Page 66 · Location 1538 Kindle edition. Accessed 18/05/2020 0653]

Much more could be done in the UK if there was the will to do it. That means accepting that our food supply is at best precarious and that we need to produce more locally. The current politics is set on abandoning UK farming and trusting ‘the market’.

The usual shop bought lettuce

Ever wondered where those bags of bright green lettuce come from? The answer is from massive fields harvested by big machines.

Notice how perfect they are. How is that done? The answer is simple by repeated application of pesticides including insecticides and fungicides plus lots of artificial fertiliser to make then look very green.

Modern pesticides are systemic which means they get into every cell of the plant. They are designed to poison any insect that bites the plant. Systemic pesticides cannot be removed, no amount of washing will get them out.

The government sets the maximum amount of residual pesticide for each pesticide in common use. But there will a cocktail of different pesticides in every plant. There is no limit to the number pesticides used. There is little research as to of effects on human health of regularly consuming  pesticide cocktails, even if the residues for each individual chemical stays within the limits. Nobody knows how they might react with each other. Things are changing as concern grows about the food we eat, see this report.

Lettuce are fed a lot of artificial fertiliser to ensure that they grow quickly and look very green. That produces more problems. First, not all the fertiliser is used, the surplus is washed into ditches, then rivers and then the sea. Excess nitrogen in water is a big problem yet is virtually ignored.

The other concern is that the soil used on farms has become depleted. It does not hold together well so get washed off in heavy rain or blows about when it is dry because it contains very little organic matter. Soil loss from erosion is a massive issue for the UK and the world with a prediction that we only have about 40 years of topsoil left. What then?

When the lettuce will be ready to harvest they are picked by hand and packed into plastic bags ready to be shipped to the retailer. Supermarkets will control the whole process from telling the farmer what variety to grow, how to manage the crop and how many bagged lettuce they want on a certain date. The field becomes an extension of the shop floor, part of a mass production process geared to make the maximum profit for the retailer.

All this because consumers have been led to believe that the cheapest, mass produced factory food is best. Bur cheap food comes with hidden costs –  read about mineral deficiencies in modern food.

People often ask why bother to pay the extra for organic produce. The answer is simple, choose food that is grown in rich fertile soils without the use of pesticides that produces more nutrient dense food that is much more sustainable or stick with factory farming. It’s you choice!

Our first lettuce of the season, grown in soil with absolutely no chemical pesticides!

This is a link to a lettuce table we made a few years back where you can grow your own even without a garden. We are about to make another so stay tuned – video to follow.

UK government and food supply chain during Covid 19 emergency

This is an audio file on BBC Sounds, it is the Farming Today radio broadcast from 28 April 2020. The interesting bit is where Prof Tim Land is interviewed about the way the UK government has handled the food supply during the Covid 19 national emergency. It starts at around 09:21 – towards the end of the piece.

Listen Here the link connects to the BBC site

Tim Lang has been saying that the food supply in the UK is precarious for over 10 years yet nobody has listened. We need a hell of a lot more diversification in the supply chain – more market gardens, more local markets more independent retailers and more organic growing! As he says, to put the whole food supply chain in the hands of 9 big companies is daft. I would say that it is more like criminal negligence.