Get the most from your plot

Ideally crops should be rotated within a plot so that the same plant family group is never in the same
spot every year. This not only helps to keep soil nutrients at their optimum but also discourages soil based pests and diseases which are often attracted to crops within the same family group.

Firstly decide on the vegetables you enjoy, giving consideration to the amount of space available. Aim to produce vegetables all the year round without shortages or gluts. The area chosen should be divided into three equal sections.

YEAR 1 SECTION 1
Dig in well rotted manure or compost in the autumn or early winter. In the first year grow Beans, Leek, Lettuce, Onions, Peas, and Tomatoes.

YEAR 1 SECTION 2
Dig the area over and add lime if the soil is acid. This can be checked by using a test kit or meter. Ideally maintain a pH level of between 6 and 7. A general fertilizer should be applied 10 to 14 days prior to planting or sowing. This area can then be used for growing Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbages, Cauliflower and Kale.

YEAR 1 SECTION 3
Apply general fertilizer prior to sowing and planting. The crops to be grown in this section include Beetroot, Carrots, Parsnips, Potatoes, and Swedes.

YEAR 2
As above moving all crops on one section.

YEAR 3
Crops and treatments are rotated once more so that all sections have grown all plants over a three year period before moving back to year 1 positions.IF THIS

IS NOT PRACTICAL IN YOUR GARDEN…
We show here the classic and well proven three year crop rotation plan. However, we realise that on smaller plots and when growing vegetables more informally in a mixed garden, this may be impossible to achieve. Even so, you should try to switch crops around to a different place each year, and avoid growing vegetables in the same group in the same area – this should still give some protection against a build up of crop specific pests and diseases in the soil.

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Manure or Compost Fertilisers and Lime* Fertilisers
Section 1 of plot

Peas

Beans

Onions

Leeks

Lettuces

Tomatoes

Spinach Beet

Celery

Succession Crops

Carrots

Beetroots

Cabbages

Section 2 of plot – Brassicas

Cabbages

Sprouts

Cauliflowers

Kales

Broccoli

Seed bed for Green Crops

Succession Crops

Onions

Section 3 of plot – Roots

Potatoes

Carrots

Beetroots

Parsnips

Swedes

Succession
Crops

Spinach

Lettuces

S

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d

Y

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Fertilisers Manure or Compost Fertilisers  and Lime*
Section 3 of plot – Roots

Potatoes

Carrots

Beetroots

Parsnips

Swedes

Succession
Crops

Spinach

Lettuces

Section 1 of plot

Peas

Beans

Onions

Leeks

Lettuces

Tomatoes

Spinach Beet

Celery

Succession Crops

Carrots

Beetroots

Cabbages

Section 2 of plot – Brassicas

Cabbages

Sprouts

Cauliflowers

Kales

Broccoli

Seed bed for Green Crops

Succession Crops

Onions

T

h

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r

d

Y

e

a

r

Fertilisers and Lime* Fertilisers Manure or Compost
Section 2 of plot – Brassicas

Cabbages

Sprouts

Cauliflowers

Kales

Broccoli

Seed bed for Green Crops

Succession Crops

Onions

Section 3 of plot – Roots

Potatoes

Carrots

Beetroots

Parsnips

Swedes

Succession
Crops

Spinach

Lettuces

Section 1 of plot

Peas

Beans

Onions

Leeks

Lettuces

Tomatoes

Spinach Beet

Celery

Succession Crops

Carrots

Beetroots

Cabbages

* Only lime if soil is known to be acid – a simple test kit can check this.

(Thanks to Samuel Dobie & Son for permission to reproduce this information.)