Category Archives: Pesticides

Information, news and opinion about the use of pesticides in agriculture and horticulture.

Broccoli Is Dying. Corn Is Toxic. Long Live Microbiomes!

Do you want the cheapest food possible? If so this is what you get: “Data going back to 1940, as reported by Eco Farming Daily, shows: “The level of every nutrient in almost every kind of food has fallen between 10 and 100 percent.”

This is not anything new, it is well documented and we have mentioned it before – “A study on the mineral depletion of the foods available to us as a nation over the period 1940 to 1991.” see the PDF is here.

There is a stark choice: you either go for the cheapest food and kid yourself that it is good value for money or you buy decent food that is not produced using high inputs of chemical fertiliser and chemical pesticides  –  organic food!

See this piece in Scientific American

Glyphosate/Roundup Decimates Microbes in Soils and the Human Gut

There has been lots of research over the years that showed that glyphosate does not break down on contact with soil, as was claimed. It now looks as if it also damages soil and the human gut.

The latest study was carried out by a team led by Professor Gilles-Eric Seralini of the University of Caen. The researchers suggest that glyphosate use could be behind the recent spike in gut disease noted in industrialized nations that genetic reasons alone have failed to explain.

People ask me why I grow/buy organic food, this is the answer.  And it is on sale in many supermarkets next to household cleaning products and sometimes next to food. It should be banned.

Glyphosate from Monsanto’s Roundup Decimates Microbes in Soils and the Human Gut – New Science

The British countryside is being killed by herbicides and insecticides – can anything save it?

“From orchids and moths to hedgehogs and toads, our wildflowers and wildlife are dying out. Making the meadows safe again is a huge challenge – but there are glimmers of hope”

The Guardian – 31 May 2018

Gloomy prospect … meadow flowers in Upper Teesdale. Photograph: Kevin Rushby/The Guardian

What has been obvious this year is the lack of insect strike on the windscreen of cars! Some say that it is a good thing, but it emphasises the huge decline in insect numbers and should sound alarm bells. The link to insecticides is obvious yet there is no response from government.

Pesticides are now sold in supermarkets alongside cleaning products. A sign of how normalised they have become. This was evident in a local branch of Tesco where pesticides were shelved next to food!

In the garden it is lawns that get the full treatment. In Spring each year there are endless TV adverts show ways to blast weeds with the latest product. For a pesticde free lawn, see this site

With climate change happening now there will be a huge impact on food supplies. Keep a small area of unsprayed grass but use the rest to grow food!

Things you can do:

  • Make a pledge to become a pesticide free household, especially if you have young children.
  • Think seriously about growing some food. Start with one metre square raised beds, all the information you need it here.
  • Become more informed about pesticides in food and how to avoid them.
  • Check out the Pesticide Action Network for more information.

 

 

What are organic standards?

Common questions about choosing organic food are; how do you know it is organic? and Is it worth it?

To be sure that it is organic look for the certification labels.

The UK has a rigorous certification scheme run by the soil association, some say it is the best in the world! It is illegal to say or sell something as organic if it is not certified.

Is it worth the extra? That depends on how much you really value the food you eat and your health. Non-organic food will contain pesticide residues at varying levels. The government set a maximum daily dose for each of them but they have never faced the problem of multiple chemical residues.

The ‘cocktail effect’ of pesticides has long-been recognised as an area of concern in the UK. Little has been done to understand the human health impacts that may occur due to continued exposure of the multiple pesticide residues that consumers eat on a daily basis.

From; http://www.pan-uk.org/dirty-dozen-and-clean-fifteen/ accessed 20/07/2019 07330

If you value your health and want to eat good food then choose certified organic produce!

 

 

Local authority weed killer spraying

I have never understood why local councils, including our own, think they have the right to spay weed killer onto the border of private property. It is about time it was banned throughout the UK.

Let’s make this a national campaign.
“Greenock gardener Stuart Graham’s campaign to get his local authority bosses to ban the use of Roundup, which contains glyphosate, has attracted international attention.

Now he hopes he may persuade the local authority to go a step further as he continues his fight.”

Organic outperforms conventional agriculture

Just to show that all the misguided hype about how we need huge inputs of fertiliser, pesticides and GM is just that, hype from the vested interest of the huge agrochemical companies that make a profit out of fear.

And organic gardening probably outperforms conventional food gardening. See this link to out own trials.

From: “Kiss the Ground: How the Food You Eat Can Reverse Climate Change, Heal Your Body & Ultimately Save Our World” 2018, Kindle edition, p.138.

Intensive farming produces less nutritious food

A recent article in Scientific American provides more evidence that intensive agricultural methods produce less nutritious food. In the UK food is bought on price, the cheaper the better. This has driven farmers into a corner because supermarkets demand the cheapest possible food. There must be an impact on human health from consuming food with less with nutrients and more pesticides.

“…it is true that fruits and vegetables grown decades ago were much richer in vitamins and minerals than the varieties most of us get today. The main culprit in this disturbing nutritional trend is soil depletion: Modern intensive agricultural methods have stripped increasing amounts of nutrients from the soil in which the food we eat grows.”

In the UK a long terms study by government scientists came to exactly the same conclusions , that the mineral content in food had decreased by 70% over 50 years.

It is easy to remineralise soil  we will be doing that in our new garden, more information and photos to follow very soon.

 

Carbon sequestration reduces atmospheric CO2

Huge amounts of carbon dioxide are stored in soil and more could be added. All that is needed is a change in the way soil is managed on farms and in gardens.

What is exciting is that it can be done today without the need for new technology to be developed or massive new machines to be built. It just needs is farmers to change the way they treat soil. Not only could that help to take CO2 out of the atmosphere and store it in soil it would also reduce fertiliser and pesticide use which means less the chemical leaching into rivers and streams. See this article about extreme levels of pollution in Europe.

There are several new books explaining how we could sequester enough CO2 to make a huge difference to climate change:

“According to Dr. Rattan Lal of Ohio State University, a pioneer in the study of “biosequestration” (using plants and microbes to sequester carbon dioxide), humans have put some 500 gigatons (billion tons) of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere since the birth of agriculture some ten thousand years ago. But most of that CO2 was emitted during the relatively recent advent of modern agriculture. Through plowing the land, which releases tremendous quantities of CO2, deforestation, urbanization, and land-use change we have effectively taken a massive quantity of carbon that used to be stored in the ground and released it into the atmosphere.”
[Tickell, Josh. Kiss the Ground (p. 18). Atria/Enliven Books. Kindle Edition.]

Small scale commercial growers and gardeners can help by not digging or rotovating their soil. For gardeners switching to no-dig beds is the best way to start. In 2010 I started a trial garden on farmland that had not been cultivated for around 30 years. No digging was involved and it worked.

The other parts of the process are the application of organic matter, compost and yet more compost! Next is not leaving the soil bare particularly in winter when heavy rain causes compaction and washes out nutrients.

$4.7M to Study Storing Greenhouse Gases in Soil

Muir Institute Leads UC Project to Find Shovel-Ready Solutions for Carbon Sequestration

Huge amounts of carbon dioxide are stored in soil and more could be added. Yet again the main problem will be extremely powerful business interests, namely the agrochemical companies and massive food producing and processing companies.

What is amazing about all this is that it can be done today without the need for new technology or massive new machines to be built. All that needs to happen is for farmers and growers to change the way they use soil. Not only does this help to take CO2 out of the atmosphere and store it in soil it reduces the chemical leaching into rivers and streams. See this article about extreme levels of pollution in Europe.

There are several books claiming that we sequester enough CO2 to make a huge difference to climate change:

According to Dr. Rattan Lal of Ohio State University, a pioneer in the study of “biosequestration” (using plants and microbes to sequester carbon dioxide), humans have put some 500 gigatons (billion tons) of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere since the birth of agriculture some ten thousand years ago. But most of that CO2 was emitted during the relatively recent advent of modern agriculture. Through plowing the land, which releases tremendous quantities of CO2, deforestation, urbanization, and land-use change we have effectively taken a massive quantity of carbon that used to be stored in the ground and released it into the atmosphere.

Tickell, Josh. Kiss the Ground (p. 18). Atria/Enliven Books. Kindle Edition.

Also see: “Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life”, David R. Montgomery – 21 Sep 2018.

Small scale commercial growers and gardeners can help by changing the way they manage their soil. Switching to no-dig beds is the best way to start. In 2010 I started a trial garden on farmland that had not been cultivated for around 30 years. No digging was involved and it worked.

The other part of the process is the application of organic matter, compost and yet more compost! Next is not leaving the soil bare particularly in winter when heavy rain causes compaction and washes out nutrients.